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20121129
20121207
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Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
witt" starts now. >>> almost nowhere. that's the words from the gop on fiscal cliff talks. but exactly where is that? and how will congress and the white house get somewhere? >>> the tug-of-war in the middle east. some new wrinkles that beg the question, is any resolution in sight for israel and the palestinians? >>> unsolved mystery. that huge powerball jackpot raised some unanswered questions beyond who won. >>> having their cupcake and eating it, too. big new twist in the hostess going out of business story. good morning, everyone. welcome to "weekends with alex witt." let's get to what's happening right now out there. there is new intrigue in the fight over the fiscal cliff talks today. both sides have messages out this morning that seem to echo the same old position. this on the heels of president obama holding a campaign-style event in suburban philadelphia to sell his solution. he said if congress does not extend the bush tax cuts for the middle class, everyone's taxes will go up january 1st. >> i'm assuming that doesn't sound too good to you. that's sort of like the lump of coa
correspondent mike viqueira. what can you make of this? fiscal cliff talks are they a nonstarter? >> i tell you, you listen to everything that is being said publicly. you see the president there. it's clear that the election, yes, is over. but the campaign goes on here. you know, i really believe that there two things that are clear from the white house to republicans. we are still in preliminary stages here, which is the good news, considering they are far apart. number two, the white house clearly feels it has the upper hand. it came with the $1.6 billion in new revenues and that's twice what the president was talking about before the election. republicans, obviously, rejecting it out of hand. we all heard by now republican leader in the senate mitch mcconnell laughed at it. there you see some of the provisions there. $600 billion in savings. some of it from medicare, another 50 billion in spending and new spending on infrastructure and stimulus spending. that's something that republicans aren't going to want to go to. the two sides are far apart. here we are on december 1st, the clock is tic
: as the country fast approaches the fiscal cliff, the two sides are talking past each other. democrats say they've laid down their marker hiking tax rates on wealthier americans. and it's up to republicans to propose specific spending cuts they want to entitlement programs. however, republicans say they've offered a concession putting revenue on the table. and they say it's now up to the president and his fellow democrats to feel some pain and propose cuts in medicare and medicaid. confu confusing? we asked senate majority leader harry reid. where's the disconnect? >> i don't understand his brain. so you should ask him, okay. >> from capitol hill to the white house, democrats say the major hurdle remains, the tax issue, whether republicans will agree not just to revenue but to raising tax rates. republicans as you will not be surprised have made clear so far that is a no-go. so what's next? well, a top republican aide told me they look forward to hearing from the white house. a top democratic aide saying, our door is open. read that, wolf, as a standstill. >> they've waited a few weeks before a
talk of avoiding the much-discussed fiscal cliff. but as november wound down, the president suggested an agreement on taxes and spending could come in time for the holidays. >> i believe that both parties can agree on a frame work that does that in the coming weeks. in fact my hope is to get this done before christmas. >> you know me, i was born with the glass half full. i'm an optimist. >> brown: hopeful signs emanated from the white house and the capitol today, about getting a deal before the new year brings automatic tax hikes and spending cuts. president obama offered his optimism at an event with middle-class americans who'd be hit by any tax increase. >> i'm glad to see-- if you've been reading the papers lately-- - that more and more republicans in congress seem to be agreeing with this idea that we should have a balanced approach. so if both parties agree we should not raise taxes on middle class families, let's begin our work with where we agree. >> brown: one such lawmaker is republican house member tom cole of oklahoma. the journal "politico" reported he's urging colleagues
@alexwit. >>> apparent progress in the so-called fiscal cliff talks. it appears both sides may be digging in their heels. nbc's mike viqueira joins me from the white house with the very latest. if there's anything new to report. seems like everyone is in their own separate corners, mike. >> reporter: it's no longer november. this is december 1st. it's a new month, the last month before we go over the fiscal cliff. now both sides after a lot of bipartisan talk of compromise in that post-election period, alex, it turns out what we have now a typical washington standoff. >> the president of the united states. >> reporter: visiting a toy factory outside philadelphia, the president urged congress to act and avoid the fiscal cliff. if not, he says, taxes go up for everyone, including the middle class. >> it's sort of like the lump of coal you get for christmas. that's a scrooge christmas. >> reporter: with the election over the president has begun a new kind of campaign, for votes in congress. a series of white house meetings with business leaders, a grassroots effort on twitter, and friday's t
politics. let's talk about the fiscal cliff. you've been part of many of a political standoff. senate majority leader from '89 to 1995. how wide is the chasm between what we are seeing and hearing on cable news outfits and in newspapers, how wide is the gap between that and what is actually transpiring behind closed doors? >> it's pretty wide. look both sides are trying to accomplish two things at the same time. and they mutually contradictory. one is they want to convey to the broad american public that they're reasonable, they're willing to compromise, they're not obstructionist. at the same time, they want to convey to their partisans we're not going to cave in. and so you get one message in the morning, another in the afternoon and kind of a mixture of them in the evening. >> how do you think it plays out? >> i think the president is in a very strong position. the election was pretty clear and decisive result. the american people now regard by significant numbers, the republicans as obstructionists. i think they have a very important objective, the republicans do, that is to shed
travels to pennsylvania friday to talk about his plan to avoid the fiscal cliff. the event is part of the white house's effort to cut public support to end the bush era tax cuts for incomes on $250,000 and above. it will be shown at noon eastern on c-span 3. >> washington worked his way up and went to harvard law school. he emigrated out west to the lead minee industry was in its heyday. he arrived by stagecoach, by train and arrived in this muddy mining town, boarded himself in a log cabin and slowly worked his way up and became a successful lawyer and got involved politically, ran for congress, search for 8 terms. he then befriended abraham lincoln, obviously from illinois, and ulysses s. grant, and as they were on the rise, he stayed with them as a close confidante and colleague during the civil war. after grant was elected president, he appointed washburn secretary of state. at that time, he became ill. his family feared for his life. after 10 days, he submitted his resignation to president grants. grant regretfully accepted his resignation. over the next several months, he reg
with talks to avoid the fiscal cliff deadlock, and everyone saying the other side is to blame, pressure secretary geithner scheduled a ground of interviews. then friday afternoon, speaker boehner's office called to say he wanted to come on fox news sunday to tell his side of the story. you will hear from bain -- john bainner a few minutes. first my conversation with tim geithner about the lack of progress in steering away from the cliff. >> secretary geithner, welcome back to fox news sunday. >> nice to see you, chris. >> i spoke with house speaker boehner before you came over here. he said when you presented your plan to him on thursday he said, "you can't be serious" and mitch mcconnell, the republican leader, said he burst into laughter. >> chris, they are in kind of a tough position now. it's obviously a little hard for them now and they are trying to figure out where they go next. we might need to give them a little bit of time to figure out where they go next. but what we did, we laid out a very detailed, carefully-designed set of spending, savings and tax changes to help put us b
are willing to advocate for what is right. i want to talk about that today. i want to -- fiscal cliff, the last time i use that term, because it's not that, but there are serious fiscal issues we should address. i want to talk about a few things we should not be discussing and don't need to talk about and one is social security. social security does not contribute to the deficit. it's not expiring. there's no reason we have to deal with social security right now. it is one of those things that some people who never liked social security, by the way, called it socialism even, want a change and has been wanting to change for decades, so they create this imagery of crisis coming at the end of the year, then what they are trying to do is say, well, we got to change social security because of the so-called fiscal cliff, although it's not really a cliff. so this is something that really shouldn't be on the table. i want to encourage folks to really discuss and get the facts, mr. speaker, because social security is solvent through 2037. doesn't need to be fixed -- does it need to be fixed? y
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)